a multi-cultural home in berlin.

a multi-cultural home in berlin via milk decoration. / sfgirlbybay

i wouldn’t have guessed at first glance that this beautiful apartment is in germany — i think my imagination took me instead to morocco, but it is indeed berlin. featured recently on milk decoration this is the very worldly and eclectic home of artist payam sharifi and his partner kasia korczak, founders of slavs and tatars, a collective based on exhibitions, books and lecture-performances devoted to an area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China known as Eurasia. thus it would make sense that their home would reflect so many different cultural influences and diversity — from poland, to turkey, iran and beyond. you can view the very inspiring tour and interview on milk decoration.

apartment in germany with moroccan decor via milk decoration. / sfgirlbybay

milk decoration feature of apartment in germany with eclectic decor. / sfgirlbybay

inspiring multi-cultural home in berlin. / sfgirlbybay

inspiring berlin apartment. / sfgirlbybay

inspiring decor and colorful textiles in berlin apartment via milk decoration. / sfgirlbybay

inspiring berlin apartment tour via milk decoration. / sfgirlbybay

multi-cultural home tour in berlin. / sfgirlbybay

• photography by christoph theurer for milk decoration.



Comments
3 Responses to “a multi-cultural home in berlin.”
  1. Nancy says:

    I love your pics! The light and large windows in all the rooms certainly adds another dimension of beauty!
    Thanks.

  2. Kaitlyn says:

    Berlin! Wow! I am totally with you, unexpected. But an amazing space nonetheless. Its funny, this home seems very minimalistic to me despite that fact that their is a lot going on. Love that!
    Also, those doors are enough to make any design lover swoon!!

    Kaitlyn
    Lilacandstyle.com

  3. The surprise that this is in Berlin is only a reflection of a narrow view of Berlin architecture, often Bauhaus to replace the 80% of Berlin living quarters destroyed in the war. In fact, the reality is that it is profoundly eclectic. I am an American, and have lived in Berlin since 1990. Presently, I live in an Altbau Berlin (“old building”) from l895. I enjoy amazing architectural features like 10′ double doors throughout this apartment, original parquet floors, enormous windows like those pictured, and 11+’ ceilings, each with its own design of Stuck, or the fanciful ceiling like that in the article. It has all the quirks of these old buildings, like an unrenovated outer hallway of huge doors, Greek style marble entry full of baby carriages, a bathroom the size of a small bedroom. My son, his wife and daughter lived here since 2008, and I took it over in 2014 with a teenager, German and American, for whom I was the guardian for six+ years. I also have to put up with a kitchen floor of creaking, rough, uneven planks around the concrete slab where the original wood burning oven and stove once stood. A friend of my son’s, studied in such features, has encouraged me to fall in love with this floor. The creaking is the sound of Old Berlin, and the boards are a prized commodity that builders are looking for to use in their new buildings. The building across from us has windows framed by reliefs of faces and other deep architectural features, although the paint is light brown and peeling. One day my granddaughter who was born into this apartment was standing at the open door pondering this building. I said, “It’s a beautiful building, isn’t it?” She replied dreamily, “Um-Hmmmm… I’ve been looking at it my whole life.” She was five. So goes a regular life in Berlin, eclectic but not unusual…

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